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Invasive and Now Not
July 1st marked the end of a ban on the use of felt-soled waders in order to prevent the spread of a type of algae called “rock snot.” The algae were thought to be invasive in the Northeast, but researchers have now concluded the aquatic algae are in fact native to the northern United States.

The aquatic algae, Didymosphenia geminata, have caused massive blooms in some U.S. rivers. Fishermen spotted it in rivers in Vermont in 2007, sparking alarm.

The algae, also known as didymo, attaches to rocks in river bottoms and has been described as resembling a sewage spill. It prefers pristine, low nutrient rivers. In its early stages, it forms nubby brown growths on rocks and later develops a woolly texture.

While the waders may be used again on July 1, the Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department is urging anglers and others to clean and dry all equipment after leaving any body of water and before going to another one to prevent the spread of aquatic invasive species that can sicken fish.


 
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Lake George Association Wins National Invasive Species Award - The Lake George Association recently learned that it was this year’s recipient of the National Invasive Species Achievement Award for Outstanding Achievement in Invasive Species Outreach and Education. The award is one of a few presented each year during National Invasive Species Awareness Week by the National Invasive Species Council, the Aquatic Nuisance Species Task Force and the Federal Interagency Committee for the Management of Noxious and Exotic Weeds.


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