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Why are so Many Fish Dying in Minneapolis' Cedar Lake?
Minnesota Department of Natural Resources spokesperson Harland Heimstra says the department received reports of a fish die-off from “multiple park staff.” Heimstra didn’t know about hundreds, but there were quite a few dead fish to be seen – especially crappies. They’ve sent specimens off to the pathology lab.

There are any number of suspects, but the most likely is a strangulation of sorts. The department recently had a fish crew on an unrelated visit to Cedar Lake, and they discovered oxygen levels from 12 feet deep to the bottom (about 50 feet) were “very low.”

“That can happen in the summertime,” Hiemstra says. Warm water is generally worse at holding oxygen, and decaying vegetation and algae – in their heyday during hot months – tend to produce oxygen-gobbling bacteria that can suffocate organisms like fish.


 
 


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Michigan Proposes Spending $14 Million on Invasive Species Prevention - More than 200 non-native species have taken hold in the Great Lakes watershed. Aquatic invaders include the parasitic sea lamprey and the quagga and zebra mussel, which have caused billions of dollars in damage to fish populations and infrastructure.


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