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Broward Canal Yields the Largest Invasive Snakehead Fish
A 14-pound, three-ounce bullseye snakehead, a member of an exotic family of aggressive, fast-growing, razor-toothed air-gulper fish was pulled from the Margate canal recently. The snakehead is an Asian invader and while the fish hasn’t proven much of a monster in Northwest Broward, where it was first discovered in a lake in 2000 and has been corralled by the canal systems’ flood-control gates and water structures, the capture does show that the population is quite healthy in South Florida.

Scientists fear snakeheads, predators that will eat just about anything and are generally larger than most native freshwater fish, could take a big bite out local populations if they spread unchecked. The fish’s freakier attributes added to the curiosity. Much like the infamous walking catfish touted as a scourge of the Everglades in the 1960s, snakeheads can survive out of water for several days. And like the catfish, a few species purportedly can wiggle across short distances on land on their fins.

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission considers the bullseye snakehead as permanently established in Northwest Broward and scientists anticipate they will eventually escape into the Everglades, but believe the warm-water species probably wouldn’t survive north of Orlando.

 
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Public Awareness or Fewer People, What Made the Difference in Decline of Marine Debris - Labor Day weekend on the Sacramento River would typically yield large amounts of floating debris. Beer boxes, foam coolers, plastic bags, alcohol containers, tubes and flip-flops left behind by visitors would normally stuff 40-cubic-yard trash containers, but this year a 30-yard container was only a third full.


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