Brazil France Germany India Indonesia Iraq South Africa
 
 
Sign up for our
free e-newsletter.





Case Studies
E-Newsletter
News
Resources
Water Management Associations
 
New Minnesota Law Requires Boat Trailers to Have AIS Decal
Everyone who uses a boat trailer in Minnesota will need to take a short training program, pass a quiz, and pay a fee starting July 1, 2015. The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (DNR) is preparing to launch the new program that will require boaters to mark their trailers with a decal proving they completed training on Minnesota laws intended to prevent the spread of aquatic invasive species.

Aquatic invasive species like zebra mussels, several species of carp, the spiny water flea, curly-leaf pondweed, eurasian watermilfoil, reed canary grass, and purple loosestrife can take over lakes and rivers, choking out native plants and animals and leaving behind poorer habitat. Minnesota law requires boaters to clean off their boats and trailers; drain ballasts, live wells, and bilge pumps; and dispose of unwanted bait in a trash receptacle in order to prevent the spread of the invasive species.

Some outdoor websites have criticized the new requirement. Asked how she would respond to citizens who felt the rule was overbearing, Rust said, "I understand that regulation and requirements get frustrating, but we have a tall order to try as a state to keep our waters in good shape. Since it's something that relies on individuals acting and understanding best practices and following the law, I think it's not too excessive to have a half hour of your life every three years and a minimal fee to ensure that not only you as a citizens but all the other folks know what they're supposed to do."


 
Click for the full article
 


About Us Categories From The Gallery   News Updates News Updates

Our Company
Case Studies
Products
Site Map

Resources/Tools
Parts/Service
International

Cosmetic Ingredient is Tainting State Lakes - While the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) says there is not enough evidence to recommend limiting its use, research by scientists at the University of Minnesota and the Science Museum of Minnesota found that antibacterial triclosan and the toxins it forms is tainting the waters.


© 2010 Copyright Aquarius Systems. All Rights Reserved. info@aquarius-systems.com   |   (262) 392-2162