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Marine Vomit Threatens to Smother Marine Life in Ireland

Aquatic invasive species, Didemnum vexillum, commonly known as “marine vomit”, is believed to have been carried from Japanese waters on ships’ hulls or in ballast water. It was first recorded in Ireland in 2005 and has spread south into Galway Bay and threatens to smoother marine life.

Eradication is almost impossible, and expensive; Ireland’s best option may be management, which would require constant monitoring and sampling.

Not enough is known about it to confirm whether it would have a serious impact on Galway Bay’s shellfish stocks such as its oyster beds, aquatic invasive species specialist Dr Dan Minchin said, but shellfish farming and scallops and herring spawning beds could all be vulnerable to it.


 
 


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Trawling for Trash in the Chesapeake Bay - Plastic detritus can be found throughout the Chesapeake Bay, especially in its underwater grasses. That’s a problem for several reasons. The bay’s underwater grasses, also known as submerged aquatic vegetation, represent a vital part of the estuary ecosystem (not to mention Maryland’s economy). Grass beds provide shelter for fish and crabs, stabilize the shoreline against erosion, and absorb nutrients from and return oxygen to the water.


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